Hikes and Wildlife

Great Wall Hikes

Every hike is guided by a member of the Chen family and takes visitors over unrestored sections of the Great Wall. All offer excellent views of the surrounding mountains and the chance to see native wildlife in its natural habitat. Each group can consist of no more than 6 people, all groups must travel together with the guide for the day.
Price: 100 RMB per group

High tower and round tower photo

High tower and round tower

High tower and round tower / 高楼圆楼

A demanding walk for the physically fit that rewards you with one of the best views of the Chenjiapu valley and surrounding area

Hunchback curve

Hunchback curve / 罗锅城
Also demanding, this walk includes some of the most picturesque Wall curves and fairy-tale narrow staircases around Beijing.

Easyover photo

Easy over

Easy over / 短路
A relatively easy walk on some nice parts of the Wall that takes most visitors 3 to 4 hours.

Local Wildlife

Butterfly on wall

A butterfly perched atop the wall

The Great Wall is home to a diverse range of animals, large as well as small. Below is a quick guide to help you spot some of the more interesting species.

Hog badger / 猪獾 (Arc tonyx collaris)

Found throughout much of China and southeast Asia, the Hog Badger is a solitary, nocturnal creature. The Hog Badger is omnivorous, rooting in the ground like a pig to find roots and tubers, fruits, earthworms, and other ground-living invertebrates. Deforestation and hunting threaten the survival of the Hog Badger, but they can still be found foraging in China’s wooded highlands.

Siberian Roe Deer / 狍子 (Capreolus pygargus)

The Siberian Roe Deer lives in woodlands and grazes in meadows and farmlands. Mostly nocturnal, this species is usually solitary but can also be found in small groups. Illegal hunting in China and neighboring countries has caused a serious decline in the Siberian Roe Deer population.

Red Fox / 狐狸 (赤狐) (Vulpes vulpes)

The Red Fox adapts well to a variety of environments, including forests, semideserts, and even urban areas. They are omnivorous, subsisting mainly off of small ground mammals, but also consume snakes, insects, fruits, and vegetables.

African Hoopoe / 戴胜鸟 (Pupupa epops)

The African Hoopoe favors large expanses of open ground where it can feed using its long pointed beak. Although it can be found throughout much of China, the African Hoopoe breeds in the north and migrates south for the winter. It can be easily identified by its striking black-tipped crest and black and white wings.

Dione Ratsnake / 白条锦蛇 (没有毒)(Elaphe dione)

Also known as the Steppes Ratsnake, the Dione Ratsnake is a nonpoisonous snake in northern China. It can survive long periods without food and and is common in Beijing and the surrounding areas.

Banded Red Snake

Banded Red Snake / 紅斑蛇 (Dinodon rufozonatum)

The Banded Red Snake is one of the most widely distributed snakes in China. It is found in all of the suburban districts and counties. In the 1980s, these snakes were still being found in parks and gardens inside the Third Ring Road, even though they are nocturnal and thus difficult to spot. Perhaps because they like to lurk in old houses, all the renovation and rebuilding has caused their numbers to decline. Now they are only found in certain places, and are extinct from many areas.

Common pheasant / 山鸡(也称野鸡或雉鸡) (Phasianus colchcus)

The Common Pheasant can now be found throughout much of Europe and North America, but it was originally imported from China. Many regional races with varying plumage occur in China and they can be found in a diverse array of environments, including woodlands, scrubby open areas, and farmlands. While males are either solitary or found in small groups, females live with their own young and occasionally in groups.

Links and sources:

The uncertain return of Beijing wildlife
A Field Guide to the Birds of China
A Guide to the Mammals of China
The snakes of Beijing

Contact Us
Make a reservation
You can also call Mr. Chen at:
(+86) 313 684 8161 (home)
(+86) 1361 126 4212 (cell)
Please note that Mr Chen does NOT speak English, Chinese only

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